Lecture: Amale Andraos/WORKac



Amale Andraos/WORKac
“Buildings, People, Plants”
The 28th Pietro Belluschi Lecture

Amale Andraos, principal of WORKac and professor and dean emeritus at Columbia GSAPP will present her practice’s recent work in a lecture entitled ‘Buildings, People, Plants.’ Andraos ‘s lecture will focus on a series of projects that re-examine architecture’s capacities to actively reshape social and environmental concerns– building on the practice’s focus on public work across scales and contexts to its focus on innovative approaches to preservation, sustainable systems, and a greater integration of architecture and landscape at the scale of buildings, amongst other.

Amale Andraos HFRAIC co-founded WORKac in 2003 with Dan Wood. She is a Principal of the firm as well as a Professor and Dean Emeritus at Columbia University, where she recently served as an Advisor on the University’s Climate Initiatives and for the newly-launched Climate School. Her publications include The Arab City: Architecture and Representation, a critical engagement of contemporary architecture and urbanism in the Middle East.

WORKac is committed to creating architecture that engages environmental and social concerns with a focus on public, cultural and civic projects. The practice has achieved international acclaim for projects such as the Edible Schoolyards in Brooklyn and Harlem, a public library for Kew Gardens Hills, Queens, the Miami Museum Garage, the Student Success Center at the Rhode Island School of Design, a new branch for the Brooklyn Public Library in DUMBO, and two community centers in Mexico City in collaboration with IUA. Current projects include the Beirut Museum of Art in Lebanon, a Public Library for Boulder, Colorado, a new commercial building in Mission Bay, San Francisco, and a new space for the Peoples Theater Project, in Inwood, New York City.

Lectures are free and open to the public.

Learn more: https://architecture.mit.edu/events/amale-andraosworkac

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