“We’ll Get There When We Cross That Bridge” with Amale Andraos and Dan Wood



0:05 – Welcome by Dean Richard Sommer
4:08 – Introduction by Robert Levit
11:35 – Amale Andraos and Dan Wood presentation
46:50 – Moderated discussion with Robert Levit
1:09:00 – Q & A

On October 12, 2017, Amale Andraos and Dan Wood presented the 2017/18 Frank Gehry International Visiting Chair in Architectural Design lecture.

Amale Andraos and Dan Wood traced their fifteen years of collaboration as the founders of WORKac. They showcased projects for MoMA PS1, Edible Schoolyards NYC, Anthropologie, Diane von Furstenberg, Creative Time, and many more. The lecture followed the format of their new book “We’ll Get There When We Cross That Bridge” – a tasting menu of everything the practice embraces: never assuming what architecture “is” but always imagining together what it can become.

WORKac is focused on re-imagining architecture at the intersection of the urban, the rural and the natural. The practice has achieved international recognition for projects such as the competition-winning designs for Hua Qiang Bei Road, Shenzhen, the Centre de Conferences in Libreville, Gabon, the New Holland Island Cultural Center in St. Petersburg, Russia, the Edible Schoolyards at PS216 in Brooklyn and PS7 in Harlem, New York, as well as the New York headquarters for Wieden+Kennedy. Current projects include a new storefront for a Parking Garage in Miami, a residential conversion of a historic New York cast-iron building, and a Master Plan for seven university campuses for Weifang, China in collaboration with Studio Pei-Zhu, SLAB, and SCAPE. WORKac was named the AIA New York State Firm of the Year in 2015 and, among other awards, received a 2015 Honor Award from the AIA NY for the Beijing Horticultural Expo Master Plan (in collaboration with Studio Pei-Zhu, SLAB and SCAPE).

Amale Andraos is Dean of Columbia University’s Graduate School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation (GSAPP) and co-founder of WORKac, a New-York based architectural and urban practice with international reach. Since becoming Dean in 2014, Amale Andraos is shaping Columbia GSAPP as a laboratory for learning that fosters the development of new types of practices and strives to reimagine the future of architecture, cities and the environment. Columbia GSAPP is home to pioneering experimentation among its students and faculty, who unite cutting edge design skills with incisive critical thinking in a diverse and energetic context.

Prior to becoming Dean, Andraos was assistant professor at GSAPP and taught at numerous other universities including Princeton University School of Architecture, Harvard Graduate School of Design, University of Pennsylvania Design School, and American University in Beirut. Her recent design studios and seminars have focused on the Arab City, which became the subject of a series of symposia and the forthcoming book Architecture and Representation: The Arab City (April 2016). Other publications include the recently re-issued 49 Cities, a re-reading of 49 visionary plans through an ecological lens; Above the Pavement, the Farm! and numerous essays.

Daniel Wood, FAIA, is Adjunct Assistant Professor in Architecture at Columbia GSAPP. In 2003 he co-founded WORKac Architects with Amale Andraos. He leads international projects for WORKac ranging from masterplans to buildings across the United States as well as in Asia, Africa, and Europe. Wood holds the 2013-14 Louis I. Kahn Chair at the Yale School of Architecture and has taught at the Princeton University School of Architecture, the Irwin S. Chanin School of Architecture at the Cooper Union, Ohio State University’s Knowlton School of Architecture, and the UC Berkeley School of Environmental Design, where he was the Friedman Distinguished Chair. He is a licensed architect in the State of New York and is LEED certified.

Stage furnishings provided by Herman Miller.

For more information about the John H. Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape, and Design at the University of Toronto, visit us at http://www.daniels.utoronto.ca

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